How to use High Watt LEDs with Arduino

For handling 9nos of 1 watt LEDs collectively by way of an Arduino, the following effortless set up could be provided simply by a 12V external supply:

 

For handling single LEDs or multiple LEDs from related Arduino outputs, individual mosfets could be essential as as follows:

 

The LED resistors could very well be measured applying the following formula:

R = (U – LEDfwdV)/LED Current

whereas U is the supply voltage

LEDfwdV is the LED forward functioning voltage of the selected range

LED current is the ampere rating features of the LEDs made use of

For that reason here U = 12V

LEDfwdV = 3.3V x 3 = 9.9V due to the fact 3nos are there anytime in just about every range and 3.3V getting the forward voltage spec of every LED

LED current = 350mA, let’s take it 300mA or 0.3Amp to preserve things better.

Substituting these in the formula:

R = (U – LEDfwdV)/LED Current

= 12 – 9.9/0.3

= 7 ohm

watts could be measured as

Watts = LEDfwdV x LED current = 9.9 x 0.3 = 2.97 watts or 3 watts
For handling 9nos of 1 watt LEDs collectively by way of an Arduino, the following effortless set up could be provided simply by a 12V external supply:

For handling single LEDs or multiple LEDs from related Arduino outputs, individual mosfets could be essential as as follows:

The LED resistors could very well be measured applying the following formula:

R = (U – LEDfwdV)/LED Current

whereas U is the supply voltage

LEDfwdV is the LED forward functioning voltage of the selected range

LED current is the ampere rating features of the LEDs made use of

For that reason here U = 12V

LEDfwdV = 3.3V x 3 = 9.9V due to the fact 3nos are there anytime in just about every range and 3.3V getting the forward voltage spec of every LED

LED current = 350mA, let’s take it 300mA or 0.3Amp to preserve things better.

Substituting these in the formula:

R = (U – LEDfwdV)/LED Current

= 12 – 9.9/0.3

= 7 ohm

watts could be measured as

Watts = LEDfwdV x LED current = 9.9 x 0.3 = 2.97 watts or 3 watts